A 3-Step “Hack” for Examining and Enjoying Scripture

bible
Articulating the “why” and implementing the “how” are two things.

That’s why some may spit some smoove words to you, but may not actually have game.

OHHHHH!

But that’s a topic for another day. (Get it together, Kevin.)

The more I spend time with well-intentioned Christians, especially youth and young adults, the more I realize that while there is a confidence when answering “why” of Scripture (purpose) , there is a lack of clarity concerning the “how” of Scripture (method of study/interpretation).

So here’s a simple 3-step process I’ve been experimenting with for both my personal time with God, as well as my ministry to high-schoolers.

Before you check it out, however, there are 2 major keys of success that you must consider in order for this to work:

Be open-minded and be diligent.

To be open-minded is to be open to the voice of the Holy Spirit teaching you from, and through, Scripture. I believe that the Spirit leads us to find both the Truth for our faith and truths for our daily living in Scripture (John 16:13). Be willing to humble yourself to the truth of the text and be taught by the Spirit, rather than teaching to it.

To be diligent is to exercise the discipline of investigation consistently and effectively. I believe God rewards those who diligently seek Him and those who do will find Him (Jeremiah 29:13)

OK. You’re ready. Here are the steps:

Step 1 – Observation

Prayerfully read the passage under consideration multiple times. Look for the following:

– The 5 Ws ( Who is writing? to Whom is he writing? When is he writing? Where is he writing from? Why is he writing? )
– Repeated words or phrases
– Genre ( type of writing)
– Themes (ideas in the passage)
– Anomalies (words that are “oddly” placed)
– Patterns in the passage (parallels, metaphors, similes)
– The subject and the object (who is talking to whom?)

After you gather enough information, ask as many questions as possible about the passage. Be sure to ask ­only observation questions at this point.

Because here’s the thing: An excellent question is always better than a mediocre answer.

As one of my friends once told me, “The Bible is a book of answers. We simply ask it questions.”

At this stage, avoid, as much as possible, from jumping into questions that pertain to your personal life. We will get to this at the reflection stage. Stay with the passage. The more detective work you do here, the better your reflection will be at the end.

Step 2 – Connection

You will have collected enough data at this point to make some connections.

Start making connections from A to B where A = point from the passage and B = other scriptural passages, personal life experiences, history, education, etc.

If you have access to tools such as Bible commentaries, Bible dictionaries, and concordances, they will greatly aid you in making these crucial connections. The more connections you make,  the better.

Step 3 – Reflection

The fruitfulness of this step depends on how much work you put into steps 1 and 2. Poor investigation will lead to mediocre connections which then would lead to powerless reflections.

At this stage, pick one instance in the passage where you saw Jesus/God.

Put yourself in that scene. Use your senses. What would you see, touch, feel, taste, hear, and smell?

Then ask some reflection questions to yourself regarding the truth about that passage:

Examples:

What is Jesus telling me in this situation?
What is stopping me from doing what He’s asking me to do?
On a scale of 1-10, how much do I relate to the disciples in this passage?

The effectiveness of this step depends on the sincerity of your heart. Believe that God wants to speak to you.
Oftentimes it’s easy to forget that the Bible is, in fact, God’s love letter to His people. As such, any passage in Scripture, when carefully considered within its context, can reveal some powerful things during this time of reflection.

So there you have it. Observation. Connection. Reflection.

Try it. 

What would you add to these steps, if any? How can you make this better? Share your thoughts below! 🙂

Three Things I Learnt from Fasting for 72 Hours

awareness

If you are reading this, it means that I’m dead, or am in the process of dying.

I can’t take it anymore..

Need………food…..

But let’s not kid ourselves. I love food WAY too much to part with it.

So I decided, instead, to participate in a cellphone/social media fast for 72 hours facilitated by the New Life Fellowship on the campus of Andrews University.

Here are three things I learnt from this experience:

The beauty of awareness

I found myself being intentionally aware throughout the day. Moments which may have been lost while being distracted by my phone were instead noticed and cherished.

My mom has a favorite mantra for us: “Be in the situation!” I’m glad that it finally got to my head, even if it was only for 72 hours!

I realized how many moments I had previously dismissed or passed over because of my preoccupation with a text or a tweet.

The fast also sensitized me to a special sense of awareness of the Spirit of God. The lack of ‘noise’ allowed me to tune in to the voice of God concerning my ministries, my relationship with others, and my connection with Him.

The fast was a much needed “comma” in the run-on sentence of my life where I could pause for reflection and assessment.

The bliss of prayer

Prayer had become so routine and mechanical for me. I would talk to God in the morning and send him “prexts” (“prayer texts”) throughout the day in my mind when I needed him to come through.
Since the fast, however, I had more time to talk to God just for the sake of talking to Him. Tough times of temptation instinctively would lead me to talk to Him, often out loud.

The fast led me to realize that prayer doesn’t have to be a calling bell for a cosmic butler, but can indeed be a conversation with a caring father.

The bane of dependence

I chose the phone/social media fast precisely because it would hurt. And hurt it.
I felt it more during the final moments of the fast, when I would want to tweet something, update my Facebook status, or text my fiancé.

When I wasn’t able to do any of this, I did feel vulnerable and, or, lost at times. I soon discerned that this was simply one example of many things I was already dependent upon; the fast helped me assess the accouterments which I had acquired and the tenacity with which I was holding on to them.

I would encourage a fast for any serious Christian who wants to take a closer look at themselves, and go farther in their relationship with their Savior.

Here’s a 5-step process that worked for me:

Step 1: Identify things in your life that you simply cannot live without.

Step 2: Prayerfully choose one of them.

Step 3: Delineate a reasonable period of time for your fast from that thing.

Step 4: Do it.

Step 5: Journal what you have learned about yourself, about others, and about God.

Who’s going to do it? If you want to challenge yourself, leave a comment below with what you are choosing to fast from!

Christmas Confessions of a Third-Culture-Kid

Christmas wont be homeChristmas is painful sometimes.

A significant part of the problem is being unable to identify what “home” really is.

Home is where the heart is, people say. But what if my heart is in many different places? Does that mean I have multiple homes? If so, then is there a place out of all these homes to really call “home?”

I am what they call a Third-Culture Kid (TCK). In short, this means that during my 25-year excursion of this world, I’ve spent developmental periods of my life in multiple countries apart from my place of birth.

Due to the high mobility shared by fellow TCK’s across the globe, home is characterized by a state of intermittence – it is fluid and in a constant state of flux.

I am a case in point.

For the first 12 years of my life, home was the verdant city of Kandy in Sri Lanka. Then till I was 19, the metropolis of Muscat in the Sultanate of Oman was home. Thanks to Uncle Sam and his provisional invite called the “Green Card”, home, since then, has been the United States.

Over the span of the last 6 years, I’ve gypsied from Maryland to Michigan, to Beirut, to Muscat, to Sri Lanka, and then back to Michigan, and will eventually head out to California.

“Where is home for you?”

If you are born and raised in your country of birth, the answer to that question would be pointedly singular and specific. But if you were to ask me that question, I’d state verbatim the previous paragraph supplemented by a geography lesson outlining the nautical distance between Sri Lanka and India and an anthropology lesson clarifying that Tamil-speaking Sri Lankans and Tamil Tiger terrorists from Sri Lanka are NOT synonymous concepts.

Home, therefore, is not where my heart is.

It is where my foot is.

Home is where I make it to be.

Home is everywhere. And home is nowhere.

Christmas, unlike any other season, unabashedly and unapologetically reminds me of home. This morning, however, as I was reflecting on the Christmas story detailed in the Bible, I was refreshed to find that my sentiments regarding home found clarity and purpose in the birth of the ultimate TCK – Jesus Christ.

God became flesh. Divinity was enshrouded in humanity. The One who knew no time was born in it. If there was anyone in history who knew the pains of being away from home it was Jesus.

While families across the globe are reunited with their loved ones during this joyous season, the Reason for the season was separated from his family, not just during his birth but for the rest of his life.

But this separation was not a complete separation. Jesus, through his life, exemplified the life of a human being who was in constant communion to his Heavenly Father. Even though there was a physical separation, Jesus felt the closeness of his heavenly home emotionally, spiritually, and relationally.

As I write this, I’m in California spending Christmas with the ever hospitable family of my significant other. At this time I can’t help but remember the many families who have adopted me in like manner by giving a bed to sleep on, food to eat, and a place to call home.

The warmth and sense of belonging I have received in these places have undeniably alleviated the pain of distance. They have taught me that while I may be physically away from those places I call ‘home’, I am and forever will be connected to them in my heart.

This Christmas I’m thankful for the many homes the Lord has provided for me during the course of my life. I truly have pieces of my heart in each of those places.

I’m also thankful that even though I may be seas away from my family, I am but a prayer away from God.

But above all, I thank God for the promise of a permanent home.

A home where I will no longer be concerned with my next flight away.
A home where I no longer need to validate my identity.
A home where I don’t have to live off of my suitcase.
A home of perpetual joy, light, and happiness.
A home that is not tampered by the vicissitudes of life nor the tyranny of time.
A home whose builder and maker is God.

I won’t be home for Christmas.

For now.

Are you a Third-Culture Kid? If so How do you deal with this concept of home especially during holidays? Leave a comment below!

What I Learnt From Raising $7000 Over 7 Days

old man

Jim* is financially cleared for this semester.

Jim’s bank account is out of the negatives.

Jim can register for next semester’s classes.

Jim won’t be kicked out of his apartment.

Jim has a bed.

A few weeks ago, this was not the case. But through a series of fortunate, yet intentional, events, few friends from my seminary (Joseph McCarty, Robert Dabney Jr, Ashton McFall ) and I were able to raise about $7100 in just over 7 days through a GoFundMe page which opened new possibilities for Jim.

Here are 4 life-changing truths that I’ve gathered from this experience.

1) Leadership is a conversation

Andy Stanley said it well:

“Leadership is not about getting things done. It’s about getting things done through other people.”

I’d like to add that it’s also getting things done with other people. The initial and only plan was to talk to Jim after our class and contribute whatever I could from my personal resources. I was surprised to see 3 other classmates who stuck around after class, and one of them had initiated conversation with Jim even before I did.

To make the long story short, based on what Jim needed, we got our heads together, came up with a plan of action, got on a texting group chat, delegated responsibilities, and the rest was history.

All four of us were united in one purpose: Help Jim.

A united vision coupled with a mutual respect and appreciation for each other allowed us to communicate with each other effectively and implement what we’d planned efficiently.

2) Orthodoxy is not enough

I am currently preparing for a profession which requires me to uphold orthodoxy to the highest level.

I wholeheartedly support our beliefs and what we stand for. But here’s what this experience reminded me:

Orthodoxy is not enough.

Knowing right principles, understanding right principles, and teaching right principles are simply not enough if they don’t lead to right behavior.

Because there’s a difference in being righteous and right-ish.

The existential crisis of learning how to present the gospel in an effective way to others while effectively neglecting to reveal it to a brother seated next to me highly disturbed me. I had to do something and I’m glad that there were others who felt the same way.

I think Dwight Nelson, Senior Pastor of Pioneer Memorial Church, summed it up well:

Orthodoxy without orthoproxy is pointless.

3) Money is not everything

As I mused with a friend who helped move the furniture to Jim’s house, we realized that it’s not Jim who got the most out of the experience.

It was us.

All of us knew Jim as someone always dressed with a smile and filled with joy. He was content.

What we didn’t know was that he had that attitude even prior to us knowing about his predicament! The man was smiling even when he had no bed to sleep on, no money in his bank account, and entirely uncertain about the future of his family.

Interacting with people in many under-developed countries and contexts has led me to believe that some of the happiest people are those who have little to no possessions. They seem to find their joy not in accoutrements of luxury nor in positions of honor but in the experiences shared with those they love.

Jim’s eyes would light up when he talked about his family. They would light up even more when he talked about his God.

Yes, the money paid for more than his needs. But what Jim was grateful for the most was for the friendship of his colleagues. He knew that money can come and go, but the friendships developed and the experiences shared during this time will last a lifetime and even beyond.

4) Choice is a power

The same ‘desire centers’ which fired up when I heard about the Syrian Refugee crises, the Paris Attacks or the San Bernardino shooting fired up when I learned about Jim’s situation.

We wanted to do something. Emphasis on “wanted.”

However, I soon realized that wanting to do something and choosing to do something are entirely different things.

The desire to act and deciding to act are two things.

In our case, we decided to act. Jim’s life changed when we chose to ask him a single question:

what do you need?”

After he responded, each one chose to do their part which resulted in Jim paying off his credit card debt, paying off his financial deficit for his schooling, and getting furniture in his apartment.

If we merely stopped at the desiring, we wouldn’t have been able to do any of that.

The power of choice is easily undervalued, underestimated, and, in many cases, under-utilized.

For Jim, a single choice took him from a desperate situation to a promising one.

For us, that same choice took us from apathy to empathy.

*not his real name.

Why I Did Not Overlay My Facebook Profile Picture

facebook-france-flag-french-paris-900x440

If you were on Facebook this week, you know exactly what I’m talking about.

Here are three reasons why I didn’t do it.

1) The problem of selective solidarity

France. Lebanon. Syria. Japan. Mexico.

These were the countries who were severely affected during the same time as France, and yet where were the respective overlays for these countries? Why was the safety check feature, albeit useful, initially enabled for one country?

I wonder: what is the hermeneutic used to determine which country gets the most attention during a given crisis? Is there an ideology that takes precedence over others? (I could get into a discussion about Eurocentrism and the effects of western ideology here, but let’s not).

If I were to overlay my profile pic, it would have been a filter with all of the flags above. But even if that filter was available, I wouldn’t be able to justifiably place it considering the number of countries who’ve had terrorist attacks just this year alone whose flags were not duly celebrated in the name of solidarity.

Besides, will a filter of a particular country be available every time there is a crisis in that land? We’ll have to see.

2) The futility of overlay. 

While some are busy choosing a decent yet flattering pic on which they can overlay the Tricolore, many are busy losing their lives. Families are losing loved ones in critical condition. I can’t remember the last time an overlaid profile pic saved or enhanced these lives.

If I did overlay my picture, I know it’s going to be a matter of time till I change it back to my regular profile pic. What would that mean? Am I no longer in solidarity anymore? What am I trying to communicate to the French?

If I’m one of the affected, here’s what I may say:

Thank you so much for showing support. But if you really want to help, here’s what you can do…

This leads me to my final point:

3) The lack of action

If I were to overlay my profile picture, I better be doing more towards France than a wonderfully coordinated set of clicks. Truth is, I didn’t. Not a single dime was expended from my bank account. Sure, if I’m stuck in a serious rut, and saw my news-feed flooded with a brown sea of Kevin faces, I’d feel something nice. But if that’s all that is done in the name of solidarity, I’m not sure how long that feeling would last.

Here’s why: solidarity without service can seem sanctimonious.

If France was a person, and I overlaid her face on mine, it would be a guarantee that that’s not all I’m going to do for her. If I’m not going to do anything more than passively ride the Tricolore sea of blue,white, and red with my surfboard of a profile pic, I’m afraid that it may only exist to make me look good among my friends.

Recently, a classmate of mine expressed that he was in a deep financial pit. Immediately, a few friends and I started a gofundme page where others could contribute funds to help get on track. I wonder what would have happened if all we did was create an overlay of his face or country and place it on our profile pics.

Don’t get me wrong. My heart aches for the families who have lost their loved ones. Terrorism is an ugly thing; a deadly outworking of the brokenness which inconspicuously exists deep within our hearts.

I also believe that the Christ of the cross is the only One who was able to face evil head on to provide both an answer and solution to it. He cares for the weak, the downtrodden, and the abused. He cares more about the plight of his children more than we do.

So then, if you are a believer, let me leave you with this question:

If God were to overlay his profile picture, which flag would it be?

 

 

pic courtesy: http://www.inquisitr.com

The Only Reason Why I’m a Seventh-Day Adventist Christian

SDA 1 reason

“Potlucks”

“Family-feel”

“Haystacks”

“My parents”

“My teacher”

“Sabbath”

“Sam’s chicken”

And the list goes on when one’s inquired about why they are a Seventh-Day Adventist.

In light of the recent notoriety the denomination has been getting through media and news networks, I had to revisit this question myself:

“Why are YOU a Seventh-Day Adventist, Kevin?”

I am not going to lie. This was a tough one. When I reflected on my 25 short years as an Adventist, however, I was able to boil it down to a single reason onto a single sentence.

The only reason I am a Seventh-Day Adventist is because I believe that we have the clearest, richest, and fullest picture of the love of God in the person of Jesus Christ.

That’s it. The following is the “un-packaging” of this  long over-due, comprehensive explanation I owe to you, my reader.

Hopefully by the end, you’ll not only get a better look into why I believe what I believe, but also understand why I do and say the stuff I do and say.

Here we go:

How we understand the Scriptures ( the Bible ) presents Jesus as a serious BOSS. He is the Writer, Editor, Compiler, Creator, Presenter, and Protector of this meta-narrative that my friend calls the “God-Story.” The Old Testament points forward to the coming of Jesus and the New Testament looks back at the Jesus who’s already come.

How we understand the Trinity exalts Jesus as One with the Father and the Spirit – distinct yet equal in authority. The Father, Son, and the Holy Spirit live out their lives in each other, through each other, and this other-centered love has been poured out full strength to the human race through the person of Jesus Christ.

How we understand creation presents Jesus as One through whom all things were made and in whom all things hold together. I believe that He is the soundtrack of all nature, and the sustainer of all life.

How we understand the seventh-day Sabbath reminds me of what was created through Jesus and what was redeemed by Jesus. This is a time where I can fully rest from my need for validation and rest in the love of God.

How we understand the nature of humanity let me know that I am known, valued, understood, appreciated, and enjoyed because I’ve been created by Jesus. Because I’m fearfully and wonderfully made, my life finds its purpose, joy, and function in and through Him.

How we understand the “God-Story” or the Great Controversy, presents Jesus as the conquering hero who has successfully completed the ultimate rescue mission in earth’s history. I find my place in this story as a beloved, victorious son of God who’ll one day see the face of his Creator, Redeemer, and Friend.

How we understand the life, death and resurrection of Jesus elevates Christ as the theme and song of all Biblical history. We believe that His account isn’t localized within just the first four books of the New Testament, but from Genesis to Revelation, every chapter and every verse, echoes His love ultimately manifested through His sacrifice on the cross.

How we understand salvation magnifies Jesus as the Author, Provider, and Finisher of our salvation. We are justified by His blood, sanctified through His Spirit, and will one day be glorified through his grace.

How we understand our spiritual growth transforms every waking moment of our existence as a spiritual experience through the spirit of Jesus. The dichotomous relationship between the “sacred” and the “secular” is decimated through Him. The more I’m aware of His presence in my life, the more I grow into his likeness so I can treat others as He did – with compassion, justice, and mercy.

How we understand the church honors Jesus as the foundational ‘adhesive’ who unites all His children together. This is a community where everyone is entrusted with embodying and telling someone the God-Story. It is a refuge in the midst of this stormy world where we pray together, play together, and process together all the while praising Him who has our back.

How we understand the mission of God’s remnant finds its reason and method in Jesus. We are to introduce others to His love, experience joy in Him, and live out our lives in him as we approach the end of this sojourn on earth.

How we understand Baptism as a symbol of our new birth, finds its impetus and rubric in the life and death of Jesus. As I rise up from the ‘watery grave’, it’s an outward expression of an inward change that has taken place because of Him.

How we understand the Lord’s Supper as an emblem of Jesus’ experience invites all His friends to authentic service, brotherly love, and faithful community in Him.

How we understand the gift of prophecy highlights Jesus as its theme of contemplation and admiration. The ministry of this prophetic gift through Ellen White has brought me closer to Jesus than anyone has ever done.

How we understand the law of God honors Jesus as the mode and purpose for relational faithfulness between God and us. Because of what He did for me on the cross, I no longer work towards victory but from it.

How we understand stewardship acknowledges Jesus as the Provider of my time, talents, and resources. I am entrusted with them to better the environments I find myself in, whether it be within the community of God or outside of it.

How we understand marriage as a heavenly institution finds its reason for existence in Jesus. His selfless love poured out to his bride – the church – gives me a model from which I can learn to love my spouse.

How we understand Christ’s ministry in the heavenly sanctuary elevates Jesus as not only my Savior and Friend, but also as my Judge, Advocate, and High Priest who prays for me even right now!

How we understand the end of life honors Jesus as the Conqueror of death! Death is not the end, but a sleep! The real and living hope of reuniting with loved ones energizes my life’s pursuits.

How we understand the millennium, the new earth, and the second coming lauds Jesus as the King of a new kind of existence – one where there will be no more sickness, no more pain, no more death, and no more sorrow. A place filled with inexpressible joy and unfathomable happiness and peace. A place where I can finally see my ever faithful Friend face to face.

There it is. The package and its contents.

I don’t have 28 reasons as to why I’m a Seventh-Day Adventist.

I have One. And He’s all I need.

What about you? If you are a Seventh-Day Adventist, why are you one? if you are not, ask me ANYTHING if you want to know more! I’ll do my best to answer them. Leave a question or a comment below!

What Christians Do That is Worse Than Rejecting God

lady backI recently read a quote last week that messed me up.

“The darkness of the evil one encloses those who neglect to pray.”
– Ellen White in “Steps to Christ.”

“Yep. Heard that before. Nothing new there. Obviously when I refuse to pray then…”

And that’s when it hit me.

She doesn’t say refuse to pray; She says neglect to pray.

Major difference.

One implies obstinance. The other indicates abeyance.
One is willful, the other is mindless.
One refers to a dismissal, while the other refers to a disinterest.

The author then goes on to make some piercing points regarding the sad reality of many Christians who don’t tap into the riches of God’s grace because they are not intentional about their spirituality.

Joshua seemed to get this towards the end of his life:

“Choose you this day whom you will serve” he said. “But as for me and my household, we will serve the Lord.” (Joshua 24:15)

The more I thought about this, the more I’m led to believe the following:

A major reason why many Christians don’t experience growth isn’t so much because of a refusal of growth as much as a lack of intention towards it. 

And this is worse than an outright rejection of God. How? Bear with me as I work up to a hopefully compelling answer.

The Bible has a recurring theme of God honoring the intentionality of his children. God has always been a Divine Gentleman – one who is decidedly anti-coercive yet hyper-sensitive to the choices of his people. God is an intentional God who functions within the parameters of our choices.
That’s why I like to think that the most powerful force in the universe isn’t God, but choice; Even God doesn’t mess with it.

So when I choose to act in favor of God, when I choose to be intentional about my spiritual growth, and when I choose to be aware of His presence, God honors my choice and I grow.

Conversely, when I choose to desecrate the Sabbath, when I choose to abuse the helpless and downtrodden, and when I choose to lust, God honors that choice, and I backslide.

But we tend to think there’s another choice – a “non-choice” –  that comes from a place where all choices that are not chosen sadly congregate like last picks in a pickup ball game waiting to be chosen. They are usually remembered after the game is played, usually accompanied by a feeling of sharp regret. They look like this:

“man, I forgot to pray today..”

“shoot, I didn’t give tithe last month.”

“ wow, how did I not…”

“I didn’t even realize…”

In case you are sarcasm-challenged, let me be plain:

There is no such thing as a “non-choice.” We always choose. Even if it’s mindlessness.

In the final estimate, heaven is for those who chose to be there. The citizens of the heavenly kingdom are not going to be there by accident or mere happenstance. On the flipside, even heaven will be hell for those who don’t choose to be there.

“But bro, are you talking about working your way into spiritual maturity? What about grace? Isn’t God’s grace going to grow us?

Good question. Here’s what I’ll tell you:

God’s grace is not conditional upon my growth in Christ, but my growth in Christ is conditional upon my intentional choice to receive and act upon his grace.

If this weren’t true, then everyone who calls themselves a “Born again Christian” would be walking, talking replicas of our Lord Jesus. But we know that’s far from the truth.

Moreover, there also seems to be a confusion between desiring growth and deciding to grow. Many well-intentioned Christians have confused wanting to grow with choosing to grow and it is significantly, yet subtly, stunting their spirituality.

I love how Karl Haffner puts it:

“We don’t grow by trying; we grow by eating.”

The Bible says that it is God who works in us to give us both the desire and the provision to act according to His good pleasure. However, if we are not intentional about choosing to respond to this work by inviting Him in and making some decided changes in our life, we are not going to grow.

You can’t work it out unless He works it in. But He can’t work it in unless you choose to let Him in.

Let’s also not forget that we have an enemy who is literally hell-bent on making sure that we are unaware of the choices we need to make. It’s been said that if the devil can’t make you bad, he’ll make you busy. He’d rather keep you occupied in temporal matters and forget God than force you to reject God. The great deceiver usually comes in the form of things that we already love and cherish to distract us from the things that are timeless and eternal.

But here is the good news:

Your choice can be the difference between being deceived by Satan and being enlightened by God.
Your choice can be the difference between failure and victory.
Your choice can be the difference between spiritual decline and spiritual growth.

Passive spirituality is worse than active rebellion. In other words, neglecting God is worse than rejecting God, for even God cannot work in a person who won’t pick a side.

So choose. Choose to be intentional about your growth. Choose where you need to place the scalpel. Choose whom you will serve.

For when you don’t choose, you’ve already chosen.